Ràpe and ràpe culture are pervasive in worldwide culture, but they have reached epidemic proportions in South Africa, which has been dubbed the ” ràpe capital of the world” with an average of 110 cases each day. Due to the lack of justice in the form of arrests, one mother in Lady Frere, Eastern Cape, was forced to save her own daughter from three drunk males.

Nokubonga Qampi contacted the police after receiving a call that her daughter Siphokazi was being sêxually ràped not far away. With nothing except a knife, Nokubonga set out to find her daughter.

”I was terrified at first, but I had no choice because it was my daughter, ” she said ” I was thinking she might be dead when I get there. . . Because she knew the offenders and they knew she knew them, they may believe they had no choice except to kill her so she wouldn’ t denounce them. ” Nokubonga hurried into the darkness, the light from her phone illuminating the dark route as she ran towards her daughter’ s screams. That same light revealed the horror of Siphokazi being ràped while two other men stood around with their pants around their ankles, ready to be ràped.

”I was terrified. . . I simply stood at the entrance and inquired as to what they were up to. When they realised it was me, they charged at me, and I felt compelled to defend myself; it was an involuntary reaction, ” Nokubonga explained. The mother does not go into great detail about the traumatic encounter or what happened afterward, which resulted in one of the attackers dying and the other two being seriously injured. Nokubonga has earned the moniker ” Lion Mama” for her bravery. When Nokubonga’ s identity was still unknown, a publication called her ” Lion Mama, ” inserting a picture of a lioness with her cubs as a visual representation of her narrative- the name and feeling remained.

Nokubonga took her daughter to a friend’ s house and was detained as soon as the cops arrived. The detention and likely prosecution of Nokubonga sparked uproar across the country, with many people calling for her release. When Buhle Tonise first took the case, Nokubonga was sad and resigned to a bleak future.

” When you meet with people who are at that level of poverty, ” the lawyer said ” you know most of the time they would feel like the mother is going to jail because she has no one to stand by her side. ” The court system is rigged in favour of the wealthy. ” In a country where poverty is based on race, this means that Black people, particularly Black women, must struggle with a court system that fails to protect them and a police force that defends ràpists.

Nokubonga was saved from her own pessimism about her fate and prosecution by the public and media effort to portray ” Lion Mama” as a hero. It is not fair that South Africa’ s legal system fails to provide adequate justice in cases of sêxual violence, but it serves as a reminder that the people’ s voice still has power. South African women have no one to rely on but

themselves and a public that is past the point of fatigue until laws are implemented in a satisfactory manner to protect ràpe victims. If the public had not expressed outrage over Nokubonga’ s murder charge and raised funds for her legal defence, she would most likely be in prison, leaving Siphokazi without a mother.

”There were a whole lot of people from all around South Africa, ” Nokubonga answered to all her well- wishers after seeing a courtroom packed with supporters. Thank you, I told everyone, for the fact that the court was packed to the rafters meant that they believed in me. They gave me a lot of optimism.“

At the completion of the trial, Siphokazi agreed to give up her anonymity in order to spread a message of hope to other ràpe survivors. ” I would tell someone that there is life after such an incident, and that they can return to society.” She answered, ” You can still enjoy your life. ” A lioness and her cub have an unique and happy ending

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